40,000 New State Laws for 2012

New laws for the new year 2012 in the USA At the begging of every year new laws are announced soon as that clock turns 12. California is king when […]

New laws for the new year 2012 in the USA

At the begging of every year new laws are announced soon as that clock turns 12. California is king when it comes to making announcements of their new Laws, listed bellow are various new Laws from around America

At the top of the list is;

Automotive laws

Los Angeles — With the New Year comes a slew of new automotive laws across the country, many attempting to curb distracted driving.

All commercial drivers — including truck and bus drivers — are banned from using hand-held and push-to-talk cellphones while behind the wheel.

The new law will affect an estimated 4 million commercial drivers, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, which instituted the ban.

It is long over due and about time the US has caught up with the rest of the world

The Vote is in !

California Gay Bullying Law (Seth’s Law)

Combats bullying of gay and lesbian students in public schools by requiring school districts to have a uniform process for dealing with gay bullying complaints. Mandates that school personnel intervene if they witness gay bullying. Law effective July 1, 2012.

California Handgun Open Carry Law

Open-carry citizen handgun ban. Supported by cops who cannot tell whether openly carried weapons are loaded or not. Violators pay $1,000 plus 6 months in jail (misdemeanor). Gun rights advocates vow to carry rifles and shotguns instead. Californians can still get permits for concealed weapons, though it is increasingly difficult. Law effective January 1, 2012.

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California’s other new laws:

•School sports teams must bench an athlete suspected of sustaining a concussion or head injury until cleared by a health care provider.

•Production, distribution and sale of beer to which caffeine has been added is prohibited.

•Sale, trade or distribution of shark fins, popular in Chinese cooking, is prohibited in most cases. Oregon has a similar new law.

•Several states have enacted requirements that some businesses use the federal E-Verify program to determine whether new workers are eligible under immigration laws.

•Alabama adds a requirement that employers who do business with the government use E-Verify for new workers. Other states adopting E-Verify requirements include Louisiana, Tennessee, South Carolina and Georgia.

•Countering the trend, California will prohibit local governments from requiring a private employer to use E-Verify.

New Laws Nation Wide

New laws requiring voters to present photo identification will go into effect in Kansas, Rhode Island, Tennessee and Texas, the legislatures conference said. Supporters of the law say it prevents fraud; opponents say it will make it harder for minorities and seniors to cast ballots.

New abortion rules also go into effect. In New Hampshire, a law will require girls seeking abortions to tell their parents or a judge. In Arkansas, clinics that perform 10 or more non-surgical abortions a month must be licensed by the state and be subject to inspections.

Raft of new state laws take effect

New laws going into some of the nation’s many quarrelsome issues, from immigration to abortion, while others understanding with tanning beds, fee and where we can sell a pet. In all, 40,000 laws were enacted.

And dont forget this last but not least
California also will ban stores from selling expired infant food and formula.

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Other highlights by state:

Alabama:

•New restrictions govern who can testify as an expert witness in civil and criminal trials in a measure aiming to limit what critics call “junk science” theories of how or why a crime occurred.

California:

•Employers cannot use consumer credit reports to evaluate job candidates, except for some exempted positions or when employers obtain consent from applicants.

Delaware:

•Civil unions or domestic partnerships for same-sex couples are legalized, giving them the same state rights and obligations of those who are married but clarifying that marriage is between a man and a woman.

Georgia:

•New safety requirements for cities that allow drivers to steer their golf carts off the green and onto roads and multi-use paths, including brakes, reverse warning devices and a horn.
Any agency administering public benefits must require each applicant to provide at least one “secure and verifiable document.”
Municipalities with 911 call centers can require retailers selling prepaid cellphones to charge a fee to support the emergency systems.

Illinois:

•People convicted of first-degree murder must be added to a new public database, similar to the sex offender registry, when they’re released from prison or any other facility. The database would include names, addresses, workplaces, schools attended and photos for offenders for up to 10 years after release.
Motorcyclists stopped at a red light may proceed through if it fails to change to green after a reasonable length of time.
Animal-control centers scanning a lost pet for a microchip also must look for other common forms of identification, including tattoos and ID tags.

Nevada:

•The state attorney general gains new subpoena powers to investigate open meeting law complaints, and members of public bodies who knowingly participate in violations are subject to civil penalties up to $500.
Music therapists and dietitians face new licensing requirements, while educators must now undergo a criminal background check when their licenses are renewed. Fire performers and apprentices must apply to the state fire marshal for certificate of registration.
A statewide emergency alert system is established for vulnerable elderly people, similar to the Amber Alert system for abducted children.

North Carolina:

•More criminals convicted of misdemeanors will be housed in county jails rather than in state prisons to save money and reduce repeat offenses.
State tax collector will have fewer powers to force corporations to redo their tax returns if they’re suspected of dodging taxes.

Tennessee:

•Penalties increasing for raping a child, creating a minimum sentence of 25 years but allowing judges to increase the time when appropriate, up to 60 years for the worst cases.
Penalties also increase for people who fire a weapon into an occupied home, a measure that seeks to curtail drive-by shootings.

Utah:

•New laws make any daily drink specials illegal, essentially banning happy hour.

Vote in Sodaheads public opinion

 

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