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    Default Charles Manson



    Charles Milles Manson
    (born November 12, 1934) is an American criminal who led what became known as the Manson Family, a quasi -commune that arose in California in the late 1960s.

    He was convicted of conspiracy to commit the Tate/LaBianca murders, carried out by members of the group at his instruction. He was found guilty of the murders themselves through the joint-responsibility rule, which makes each member of a conspiracy guilty of crimes his fellow conspirators commit in furtherance of the conspiracy's object.

    Manson is associated with "Helter Skelter," the term he took from the Beatles song of that name and construed as an apocalyptic race war the murders were putatively intended to precipitate. This connection with rock music linked him, from the beginning of his notoriety, with pop culture, in which he became an emblem of insanity, violence, and the macabre. Ultimately, the term was used as the title of the book prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi wrote about the Manson murders.

    At the time the Family began to form, Manson was an unemployed ex-convict who had spent half his life in correctional institutions for a variety of offenses. In the period before the murders, he was a distant fringe member of the Los Angeles music industry, chiefly via a chance association with Beach Boy Dennis Wilson.



    After Manson was charged with the crimes, recordings of songs written and performed by him were released commercially. Artists including Gun N' Roses and Marilyn Manson have covered his songs in the decades since.
    Manson's death sentence was automatically reduced to life imprisonment when a 1972 decision by the Supreme Court of California temporarily eliminated the state's death penalty.



    California's eventual reestablishment of capital punishment did not affect Manson, who is an inmate at Corcoran State Prison.

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    Default Charles Manson - A Chronology



    November 12, 1934

    Charles Manson is born in Cincinnati, the illegitimate son of a sixteen-year-old girl named Kathleen Maddox. His father, who Manson never met, was a "Colonel Scott" from Ashland, Kentucky.

    1939
    Manson's mother, a heavy drinker, is sentenced to prison for armed robbery.

    1947
    Manson's mother tries to send Charles to a foster home. A court orders him sent to the Gibault School for Boys in Terre Haute, Indiana.

    1948
    Manson commits his first known crime, the burglary of a grocery store. He is caught and sent to a juvenile detention center. He escapes and commits two armed robberies. Apprehended again, Manson is sent to the Indiana School for Boys in Plainfield, where he spends the next three years--except for brief periods of freedom during eighteen escapes.

    1951
    Manson escapes from the School for Boys and heads west in a stolen car, burglarizing 15 to 20 gas stations along the way. He is caught in Utah and sent to the National Training School for Boys in Washington, D. C. A psychiatrist calls Manson a "slick" but "extremely sensitive" boy.

    1952
    In his last act of criminal violence before the 1969 murders, Manson sodomizes a boy while holding a razor to his throat. He is transferred to Federal Reformatory at Petersburg, Virginia. Later in 1952, Manson is moved to a more secure reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio.

    1955
    Manson marries Rosalie Willis, a waitress from Wheeling. The couple produces a child, Charles, Jr. Manson works as a parking-lot attendant and busboy--and steals cars. In October, he is arrested for auto theft and sentenced to five years probation

    1956
    Manson is sentenced to three years imprisonment at San Pedro, California for violating the terms of his 1955 probation.

    1958
    Manson is divorced. His ex-wife retains custody of their child. Manson is released on parole and becomes a pimp in southern California.

    1959
    Manson is arrested for forging a treasury check. He is given a ten-year suspended sentence.

    1960
    In January, Manson marries again--this time, a nineteen-year-old. In April, he is indicted on federal Mann Act charges. He is arrested in Laredo, and brought back to California where is ordered to prison to serve the ten-year sentence that had been suspended in 1959.

    1961
    Manson is transferred to a federal penitentiary at McNeil Island, Washington. He claims to be a Scientologist. Prison psychiatrists say he has "deep-seated personality problems."

    1963
    After fathering a second child, Charles Luther Manson, Manson is again divorced.

    1964
    Manson becomes obsessed by the music of the Beatles. He learns to play a steel guitar.

    1966
    Manson aspires to be a song writer, and devotes most of his spare time in prison to the task.

    March 21, 1967
    Manson asks prison officials to let him remain in prison, but having completed a ten-year prison term, he is released. He heads for San Francisco.

    Summer 1968
    Manson and a number of his followers, now called "The Family," move into Spahn ranch in southern California.

    December 1968
    The Beatles release their White Album, which proves to be a great influence Manson's thinking.

    March 23, 1969
    Manson visits 10050 Cielo Drive (the Tate residence) looking for Terry Melcher, who he hoped might publish his music. Tate's photographer curtly tells Manson to leave by "the back alley," possibly supplying a motive for the later attack at the Tate home.

    July 31, 1969
    A music teacher named Gary Hinman is stabbed to death. On the wall near the body, in Hinman's blood, was printed "political piggy."

    August 8, 1969
    Manson tells Family members, "Now is the time for Helter Skelter." That evening he tells Patricia Krenwinkel, Susan Atkins, Tex Watson, and Linda Kasabian to get knives and changes of clothes. As he sends them from the ranch on their mission, he tells them "to leave a sign --something witchy." Watson drives to the Tate residence.

    August 9, 1969
    Shortly after midnight, the brutal attack on residents at the Tate residence begins. In all, 102 stab wounds are inflicted on four victims; a fifth victim is shot. Left dead are actress Sharon Tate, Jay Sebring, Voytek Frykowski, Abigail Folger, and Steven Parent. The murders are discovered by housekeeper Winifred Chapman the next morning. The four Family members return to Spahn ranch, where Manson criticizes them for doing a messy job. That night, Manson, along with Patricia Krenwinkel, Tex Watson, Leslie Van Houten, Linda Kasabian cruise around, looking for potential victims.

    August 10, 1969
    In the early morning hours, Family members stab to death Leno and Rosemary LaBianca. The words "Death to Pigs" and "Healter [sic] Skelter" are found printed on a wall and a refrigerator door.

    September 1, 1969
    Under a bush near his home, a ten-year-old boy finds the gun used in the Tate murders. The boy's father turns the gun over to the LAPD. The LAPD fails to do a proper investigation.

    October 12, 1969
    Manson is arrested at Barker Ranch in Death Valley and charged with grand theft auto. He is put in jail in Independence.

    November 6, 1969
    While incarcerated in Los Angeles on other charges, Susan Atkins tells a fellow inmate, Virginia Castro (Graham), that she participated in the Tate murders. She tells Castro of a "death list" of celebrities targeted by the Family, including Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Tom Jones, Steve McQueen, and Frank Sinatra.

    November 12, 1969
    Al Springer, a visitor to the Spahn ranch, tells LAPD detectives that on August 11 or 12 Charles Manson had bragged about "knocking off five" pigs the other night.

    November 17, 1969
    Danny DeCarlo implicates Manson in the Spahn ranch murder of Shorty Shea, and also suggests that persons at the Spahn ranch might also have been responsible for the Tate murders--but, he tells detectives, he would be afraid to testify.

    November 18, 1969
    Prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi is assigned the Tate-LaBianca case.

    July 24, 1970
    The Tate-LaBianca murder trial, with defendants Charles Manson, Susan Atkins, Patricia Krenwinkel, and Leslie Van Houten, opens in Los Angeles.

    August 10, 1970
    Judge Older grants Linda Kasabian immunity from prosecution for the Tate-LaBianca murders in return for agreeing to appear as the prosecution's star witness at the Manson trial.

    November 16, 1970
    The state rests its case in the Manson trial.

    November 19, 1970
    The defense announces, without having presented any evidence, that it also rests.

    November 20, 1970
    Manson announces that he wishes to testify. He makes a strange statement, saying "The children that come at you with knives are your children. You taught them. I didn't teach them. I just tried to help them stand up...." On cross-examination, Bugliosi asks Manson if he thinks he is Jesus Christ.

    November 30, 1970
    Defense attorney Ronald Hughes fails to show up in court. He is never seen again, leading to speculation he was murdered by The Family.
    January 15, 1971
    Vincent Bugliosi presents the prosecution's closing argument in the Manson trial.

    January 25, 1971
    The jury convicts all Tate-LaBianca defendants of first-degree murder.

    March 29, 1971
    Concluding the penalty phase of the trial, the jury fixes the penalty as death for all four Tate-LaBianca defendants.

    April 19, 1971
    Judge Older sentences Manson to death. Manson is ordered sent to San Quenton's death row.

    October 1971
    Charles "Tex" Watson is convicted on seven counts of first-degree murder.

    February 18, 1972
    The California Supreme Court declares the death penalty unconstitutional and Manson's sentence is automatically reduced to life in prison.

    October 1972
    Manson is transferred to Folsom Prison.

    May 1976
    Manson is sent to Vacaville prison, where he remains for the next nine years.

    September 25, 1984
    Another inmate, claiming "God told me to kill Manson," sets Manson on fire, causing serious burns on large parts of his body.

    July 1985
    Manson is transferred to San Quentin Prison

    1988
    In a televised interview with Geraldo Rivera, Manson warns, "I'm going to chop up more of you m-----f----ers. I'm going to kill as many of you as I can. I'm going to pile you up to the sky."

    March 1989
    Manson is transferred to Corcoran Prison.

    1994
    The house at 10050 Cielo Drive, formerly rented by Sharon Tate and Roman Polanski, is demolished.

    March 1997
    Manson is denied parole (for the ninth time) in a hearing broadcast live on Court TV. Manson responds by saying, "That's cool....I'm not saying I wasn't involved [in Helter Skelter]. I'm just saying that I did not break God's law....Thank you."

    April 2002
    Manson is refused parole for the tenth time at a hearing he refused to attend.

    May 23, 2007
    Manson is refused parole for the eleventh time. Manson, now 72, will next be up for parole in 2012.

    July 15, 2008
    The parole board denies Susan Atkin's request, based on the fact that she has terminal brain cancer and only months to live, for a compassionate release. Atkins will now almost certainly die in prison.


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    Default Testimony of Charles Manson in the Tate-LaBianca Murder Trial

    Testimony of Charles Manson in the
    Tate-LaBianca Murder Trial

    Direct testimony:
    There has been a lot of charges and a lot of things said about me and brought against the co-defendants in this case, of which a lot could be cleared up and clarified. . . .

    I never went to school, so I never growed up to read and write too good, so I have stayed in jail and I have stayed stupid, and I have stayed a child while I have watched your world grow up, and then I look at the things that you do and I don't understand. . . .

    You eat meat and you kill things that are better than you are, and then you say how bad, and even killers, your children
    are. You made your children what they are. . . .

    These children that come at you with knives. they are your children. You taught them. I didn't teach them. I just tried to help them stand up. . . .
    Most of the people at the ranch that you call the Family were just people that you did not want, people that were alongside the road, that their parents had kicked out, that did not want to go to Juvenile Hall. So I did the best I could and I took them up on my garbage dump and I told them this: that in love there is no wrong. . . .

    I told them that anything they do for their brothers and sisters is good if they do it with a good thought. . . .

    I was working at cleaning up my house, something that Nixon should have been doing. He should have been on the side of the road, picking up his children, but he wasn't. He was in the White House, sending them off to war. . . .

    I don't understand you, but I don't try. I don't try to judge nobody. I know that the only person I can judge is me . . . But I know this: that in your hearts and your own souls, you are as much responsible for the Vietnam war as I am for killing these people. . . .

    I can't judge any of you. I have no malice against you and no ribbons for you. But I think that it is high time that you all start looking at yourselves, and judging the lie that you live in.

    I can't dislike you, but I will say this to you: you haven't got long before you are all going to kill yourselves, because you are all crazy. And you can project it back at me . . . but I am only what lives inside each and everyone of you.
    My father is the jailhouse. My father is your system. . . I am only what you made me. I am only a reflection of you.

    I have ate out of your garbage cans to stay out of jail. I have wore your second-hand clothes. . . I have done my best to get along in your world and now you want to kill me, and I look at you, and then I say to myself, You want to kill me? Ha! I'm already dead, have been all my life. I've spent twenty-three years in tombs that you built.

    Sometimes I think about giving it back to you; sometimes I think about just jumping on you and letting you shoot me . . . If I could, I would jerk this microphone off and beat your brains out with it, because that is what you deserve, that is what
    you deserve. . . .

    If I could get angry at you, I would try to kill everyone of you. If that's guilt, I accept it . . .These children, everything they
    done, they done for the love of their brother. . . .

    If I showed them that I would do anything for my brother--including giving my life for my brother on the battlefield--and
    then they pick up their banner, and they go off and do what they do, that is not my responsibility. I don't tell people
    what to do . . . .

    These children [indicating the female defendants] were finding themselves. What they did, if they did whatever they did, is
    up to them. They will have to explain that to you. . . .

    It's all your fear. You look for something to project it on, and you pick out a little old scroungy nobody that eats out of a
    garbage can, and that nobody wants, that was kicked out of the penitentiary, that has been dragged through every hellhole that you can think of, and you drag him and put him in a courtroom.

    You expect to break me? Impossible! You broke me years ago. You killed me years ago. . . .

    [Judge Older asked Manson if he had anything further to say.]
    I have killed no one and I have ordered no one to be killed. I may have implied on several different occasions to several different people that I may have been Jesus Christ, but I haven't decided yet what I am or who I am. Some called him Christ, Manson said. In prison his name was a number. Some now want a sadistic fiend, and so they see him as that. So be it. Guilty. Not guilty. They are only words. You can do anything you want with me, but you cannot touch me because I am only my love. . . If you put me in the penitentiary, that means nothing because you kicked me out of the last one. I didn't ask to get released. I liked it in there because I like myself.

    [ Judge Older told Manson, "You seem to be getting far afield." He told Manson to stick to the issue raised in the trial.]

    The issues? . . . Mr. Bugliosi is a hard-driving prosecutor, polished education, a master of words, semantics. He is a genius. He has got everything that every lawyer would want to have except one thing: a case. He doesn't have a case. Were I allowed to defend myself, I could have proven this to you. . .

    The evidence in this case is a gun. There was a gun
    that laid around the ranch. It belonged to everybody. Anybody could have picked that gun up and done anything they
    wanted to do with it. I don't deny having that gun.
    That gun has been in my possession many times. Like the rope was there because you need rope on a ranch. . . .

    It is really convenient that Mr. Baggot found those clothes. I imagine he got a little taste of money for that. . . .

    They put the hideous bodies on [photographic] display and they imply: If he gets out, see what will happen to you. . . .

    [Helter Skelter] means confusion, literally. It doesn't mean any war with anyone. It doesn't mean that some people are going to kill other people. . .

    Helter Skelter is confusion. Confusion is coming down around you fast. If you can't see the confusion coming down around you fast, you can call it what you wish. . Is it a conspiracy that the music is telling the youth to rise up against the establishment because the establishment is rapidly destroying things? Is that a conspiracy? The music speaks to you every day, but you are too deaf, dumb, and blind to even listen to the music. . .

    It is not my conspiracy. It is not my music. I hear what it relates. It says "Rise," it says "Kill." Why blame it on me? I didn't write the music. . . .

    Danny DeCarlo. . .
    said that I hate black men, and he said that we thought alike. . . But actually all I ever did with Danny
    DeCarlo or any other human being was reflect him back at himself. If he said he did not like the black man, I would say
    'O.K.' So consequently he would drink another beer and walk off and say 'Charlie thinks like I do.' But actually he does
    not know how Charlie thinks because Charlie has never projected himself. I don't think like you people. You people put
    importance on your lives. Well, my life has never been important to anyone. . . .

    [Linda Kasabian] gets on the stand and she says when she looked in that man's eyes that was dying, she knew that it was
    my fault. She knew it was my fault because she couldn't face death. And if she can't face death, that is not my fault.
    I can
    face death. I have all the time. In the penitentiary you live with it, with constant fear of death, because it is a violent world in there, and you have to be on your toes constantly. . . .

    [I taught the Family] not to be weak and not to lean on me. . . .

    I told [Paul Watkins],"To be a man, boy, you have to stand up and be your own father." So he goes off to the desert and finds a father image in Paul Crockett. . . .

    I do feel some responsibility. I feel a responsibility for the pollution. I feel a responsibility for the whole thing. . . .
    To be
    honest with you, I don't recall ever saying "Get a knife and a change of clothes and go do what Tex says." Or I don't recall saying "Get a knife and go kill the sheriff." In fact, it makes me mad when someone kills snakes or dogs or cats or horses. I don't even like to eat meat-that is how much I am against killing. . . .

    I haven't got any guilt about anything because I have never been able to see any wrong. . .
    I have always said: Do what
    your love tells you, and I do what my love tells me . . .

    Is it my fault that your children do what you do? What about your
    children? You say there are just a few? There are many, many more, coming in the same direction. They are running in the streets-and they are coming right at you!

    Cross-examination by Vincent Bugliosi:
    Q. You say you are already dead, is that right, Charlie?
    A. Dead in your mind or dead in my mind?
    Q. Define it any way you want to.
    A. As any child will tell you, dead is when you are no more. It is just when you are not there. If you weren't there, you
    would be dead.
    Q. How long have you been dead? . . To be precise about it, you think you have been dead for close to 2,000 years, don't you?
    A. Mr. Bugliosi, 2,000 years is relative to the second we live in.
    Q. Suffice it to say, Department 104 is a long way from Calvary, isn't that true?...
    Q. The jury in this case never heard a single, solitary word you said. . .Mr. Manson, are you willing to testify in front of the jury and tell them the same things that you have testified to here in open court today?
    [ Kanarek objected and Judge Older sustained the objection. Older asked Manson if he now wished to testify before the
    jury. He replied, "I have already relieved all the pressure I had." Manson left the stand. As he walked by the counsel table, he told his three co-defendants, "You don't have to testify now."]

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    (CBS) In the last century, perhaps no other person in America has defined evil more than Charles Manson. In the summer of 1969, Manson’s followers brutally murdered actress Sharon Tate and six others under his orders.

    It would become known as the Tate/LaBianca murders. Manson and three women (Patricia Krenwinkel, Susan Atkins and Leslie Van Houten) stood trial for murder. A fourth Manson follower who was present at the murders, Linda Kasabian, was indicted with the others, but turned state's evidence and was granted immunity in exchange for her testimony.

    In January 1971, Manson was convicted of conspiracy to commit murder; Atkins and Krenwinkel were convicted of murder. All received the death penalty. Soon thereafter, California ruled the death penalty unconstitutional and the sentences were changed to life in prison with the possibility of parole.

    Vincent Bugliosi, the prosecutor in the Manson trial, wrote of the case in a book called "Helter Skelter." "Helter-Skelter" was a song on the 1968 Beatles "White Album." The lyrics fit with Manson's theory- "Look out helter skelter, helter skelter, helter skelter. She's coming down fast. Yes she is. Yes she is." Manson preached that the black man was going to rise up and start killing the whites and turn cities into an inferno of racial revenge. He believed that the black man would win the war, but couldn't hold onto the power because of innate inferiority. Manson and his "family" would be safe from the racial holocaust because they would be hiding in the desert, safe from the racial wars in the cities.

    And the book, Bugliosi tells The Early Show co-anchor Harry Smith, has continued to attract readers. He notes, "The Manson murder case, unlike any other mass murder case in history, continues to fascinate to this very, very day. It never stops. People want to ask questions about it.

    “But apart from that, apart from the fascination, The Los Angeles Times was pointing out as of a couple of years ago, Manson continues to receive more mail than any other inmate in the history of the U.S. prison system. Who are writing to him? Young kids, impressionistic, going through a rebellious state and view him as some type of anti-establishment hero, a glorious outlaw.”

    So on Sunday night, CBS will broadcast "Helter Skelter," a new movie about the Manson case.

    Bugliosi says, “I think this TV movie will educate a whole new generation of young people as to who precisely Charles Manson is.“

    In 1976, CBS broadcast the mini-series, "Helter Skelter," which averaged 36.4 ratings/54 share over two nights and is the highest rated two-part made-for-TV movie ever. The new version focuses more on who Charles Manson was, why he did what he did, and how this 34-year-old man, who had spent two-thirds of his life behind bars, was able to influence others to commit such horrific acts.

    Bugliosi says, “He didn’t knock down the homes of Iowa and say, ‘Do you have any young kids? I would like to bring them along.’ Every one of these kids came from average American backgrounds, good backgrounds, but every one had already dropped out of society. Most were heavily involved in the use of psychedelic drugs... I would stipulate these murders would not have happened if it weren’t for Charles Manson, but he had the raw material to work with and he was like the catalyst that brought that hostility to the surface.

    “He never told these people, 'Either you murder for me or I’m going to murder you.' There were several members of his family totally subservient, do anything for him, but wouldn’t kill for him. They didn’t have enough guts in their system to kill a fellow human being, but their religion; their cradle was to commit murder. They had plans to kill Sinatra, Liz Taylor, folks like that. They were going to travel around country and murder families in American homes. It was their religion. They enjoyed killing.”




    http://investigation.discovery.com/v...son-trial.html



    http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?...ted;photovideo

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    Manson Quotes
    " A lot of what they pushed off on me is not me. "



    " All the men in the joint raised me up, told me what to do, what was right and wrong, told me when to sit down,
    when to stand up, I just did whatever I was told. "



    " All this occult and that hocus pocus stuff that you guys are playing, I don't nothing about all that. "



    " Did I kill anyone? "



    " Did we have the castle there with the vampires and the Frankenstein, and the bugs and lizards dying in the desert? "



    " From the world of darkness I did loose demons and devils in the power of scorpions to torment. "



    " Get out of here? Where would I go now, see. "



    " Getting up every day and going through this again and again is hard. "



    " Good for some may not be the same for others. "



    " He's a Flying Tiger man, from Madam Shanghai's Shack. I just wrote him a letter today. "



    " Here I am an old man sitting in this cell, that's the damndest thing I ever seen, you know. "



    " How many are my natural ego? "



    " How old am I? I'm as old as my mother told me. How's that? "



    " I ain't got no magical powers and mystical trips and all that kind of crap. It's kind of silly. "



    " I come out and sit down. I ain't gonna get whipped again. "



    " I cut a route through Acapulco, and I smoked Acapulco before you knew what it was. "



    " I did good in uh, every place that I was ever told to go good in. "



    " I didn't want to scare you guys out of the neighborhood right away. "



    " I don't know pain! I don't know pain! I have no depth of pain! I have no depth of suffering! I don't know ridicule! "



    " I don't want to hit you. I, uh, got out of prison and I went up in the streams and I saw a big fat dead rat laying in the water. "



    " I feel pretty good. Take me back to the old river. "



    " I get some classical music on the 98 station. "



    " I got a sleeping bag and a guitar and I'm standing at old blind man's ranch and that's about the extent of it. "



    " I haven't been punished all my life since I was 10 years old! I've been in every reform school you've got across the country. "



    " I just chew on my pipe and think about it and do the best I can. "



    " I lived in the tombs and I was in the Cook County Jail in Chicago when you were playing cricket in high school. "



    " I love the world I live in too just like Reagan loves the world he lives in. "



    " I loved my mother, she's a good girl. "



    " I never had long hair before I got busted. I never had a beard before I got busted. "



    " I never thought I was normal, never tried to be normal. "



    " I punched my mother out once. "



    " I said I can't handle the maniacs outside, let me back in. "



    " I uh, don't dislike or like. "



    " I understand jail so I understand myself so I can deal with that. "



    " I used to have to lay down and get my ass whipped till I couldn't walk. Tell me about some pain. Yeah. "



    " I used to love that desert, out in the woods and things. I didn't know you could get out in the woods for 30 years. "



    " I was a beatnik in the '50s before the hippies came along. "



    " I was a teddy bear, then I was the goof ball, whatever, and uh, what is the real one, where is the real one.
    He's in a nut ward somewhere."



    " I was borned illegitimately, that put me on the other side of the law. "



    " I was playing with some Hell's Angels that you don't know nothing about. "



    " I'd probably try to stop the rain forests from being cut down.
    I'd probably join the revolution down south somewhere and try to save my life on the planet Earth.
    I might go to Libya. I might go see the Ayatollah. I might go to France, catch somebody in France I'm upset with. "



    " I'm a reflection of your negative, there's no doubt about that. "



    " I'm an outlaw and I go so far and then that's all you know. "



    " I'm not gonna grow up, I'm not gonna go to college. "



    " I'm not of this generation. "



    " I'm not very wise to many things. "



    " I'm playing for my life. You're working for money. "



    " I'm still 10 years old in your world. "



    " I'm stupid to the point where I'm not really sure. "



    " I'm your brother, Beausoleil, Beausoleil. I just got out of prison. "



    " I've been up and down these damn hallways, in and out of these nut wards for the last 10 years.
    You think you can follow that act? "



    " If I could get some help from the doctor then I could get my mind straightened out a little bit and I come back and play like a human. "



    " If you're thinking exposure to danger, then that danger you're thinking is coming around you. "



    " Is the truth fun? "



    " It was sickening, you know? "



    " It's a comedy tragedy, uh opera that was played in the, uh, early morning. "



    " It's worse than a fairy tale. "



    " James Early Ray's got his problems, I got mine. "



    " Just because you're convicted in a court room doesn't mean you're guilty of something. "



    " Let's go back to that word innocent. Are you so white and pure? "



    " Living is what scares me. Dying is easy. "



    " Most insecure people need attention. I don't. "



    " My life is not important here. "



    " No, I don't think the drugs have hurt me. If I overdone it I think it would. "



    " Oh, I'm in the world all by myself? "



    " Oh, my friends back in to do the terrible deed. "



    " Over a period of about 20 years, I would imagine you'd want to change something. "



    " Pain's not bad, it's good. It teaches you things. I understand that. "



    " Same question again. Did I break the law? Is that your question? "



    " See, like you live in another world. I live in street people's world. "



    " Tex took the witness stand, and this is record. Tex didn't have his own mind one way or the other. "



    " That's make believe to the people that went in there and did what they did. "



    " The train's hard. The road's rough. "



    " There's different colors on different people's backs doing different things. It's a different world. "



    " There's only one person you should be a-scared of and that's yourself. Afraid of what, losing your bank account? "



    " There's the possibility the preacher can teach me something, because the reverend is quite a guy.
    And I'm finding they got two or three doctors here that got a lot of sense. "



    " They said I had a great family and I was the followers and the leader.
    There was no followers and no leaders, bunch of kids out at the ranch playing, to me. "



    " Tomorrow creeps its petty pace. "



    " We used to have some cosmic gatherings back in the mountains that would probably shake a
    Mormon Tabernacle Choir's eardrums. "



    " We'll be here for a thousand years unless you let me finish. "



    " Well, most people do themselves wrong. "



    " When I got up on Death Row in cell 13 for nine counts of murder 1969, I said to myself, My goodness,
    what the hell am I doing here, I didn't want to come here. "



    " Word is, you're an old woman. Word is, you have turkey in the sky. I don't know what word is. "



    " Yeah, I got a kid somewhere. "



    " Yeah, I know about Helter Skelter! It was a song that some people sang! "



    " You dealt the hand down there in LA. You and that press, you and that, uh, LA Times. "



    " You got a pistol on you? I just thought you might not like what I have done and want to do something about it. "



    " You guys are misinformed. I haven't killed anyone. "



    " You know, a long time ago being crazy meant something. Nowadays everybody's crazy. "



    " You put me on Life Magazine and had me convicted before I walked into the court room. "



    " You talking about dying, now, it gets me nervous. "



    " Your honor, I got a voice, let me talk. "


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    Default Transcript of 1992 Parole Hearing:

    The following is a transcript of Charles Manson's Parole Consideration Hearing in April 1992,
    It is long and covers quite a few posts, I found it very interesting, once I started I had to read it all,

    It is worth reading!



    PAROLE CONSIDERATION HEARING
    STATE OF CALIFORNIA
    BOARD OF PRISON TERMS

    In The Matter of The Life Term Parole Consideration Hearing of:



    CHARLES MANSON
    CDC NUMBER B - 33920
    CALIFORNIA STATE PRISON
    CORCORAN, CALIFORNIA
    TUESDAY
    APRIL 21, 1992
    1332 HOURS

    MEMBERS PRESENT
    Ron Koenig, Board Comissioner, Presiding
    Joseph Aceto, Board Commissioner
    Cleo Brown, Deputy Board Commissioner

    ALSO PRESENT

    Charles Manson, Inmate
    Stephen Kay, Deputy District Attorney County of Los Angeles

    P R O C E E D I N G S
    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG:

    These hearings are
    being taped, Mr. Manson, so if you would answer up so that it will
    be recorded, please.

    This is a subsequent parole consideration hearing for Charles
    Manson, B-33920. Received California Department of Corrections on
    April the 22nd, 1971 pursuant to Penal Code Section 1168 for
    violation of Section 187; California Penal Code, first degree murder,
    counts one through seven and 182.1/187, conspiracy to commit
    murder, count eight, stayed; Los Angeles County case number
    A-252156.

    On February the 2nd, 1977, this sentence was changed being case
    number A-252156 from death to life pursuant to Court of Appeal.
    The prisoner was additionally received on December the 13th, 1971
    for violation of P.C. 187, first degree murder, concurrent with prior
    term, Los Angeles County case number 8267861, count one.

    Counts two and three of case number A-267861 for violation of
    P.C. 182.1/187/211 and 187, conspiracy to commit murder and
    robbery and first degree murder were stayed.

    The controlling minimum eligible parole date is December - was
    December 13th, 1978.

    Today's date is April the 22nd, 1971 [sic]. The time is now 1332
    hours and we are at the Corcoran State Prison.

    For purposes - participants in today's hearing are Commissioners
    Koenig and Aceto and Deputy Commissioner Brown. Representing -
    the prisoner has declined an attorney, a state- represented
    attorney or an attorney of his own.

    Representing the people of the
    County of Los Angeles is Stephen Kay.

    We also have several
    members of the news media attending the hearing today and the
    CNPR and assistant CNPR, and we have an observer in the room.
    For purposes of identification we're going to go around the room,
    state our first name, last name and why we are here. I want only
    participants in the hearing to participate in this.

    I am Ron Koenig. I'll start and I'll go to my right. Mr. Manson, when
    we come to you would you also give your C.D.C. number.

    Okay.
    I am Ron Koenig, K - O - E - N - I - G. and I'm Commissioner for the
    Board of Prison Terms.

    BOARD COMMISSIONER ACETO: Good afternoon. Joe Aceto, A - C -
    E - T - O. Commissioner, Board of Prison Terms.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Cleo Brown, B- R - O - W
    - N. Deputy Commissioner, Board of Prison Terms.

    MR. KAY: Okay. I'm Stephen Kay, Deputy District Attorney of Los
    Angeles County.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Mr. Manson?

    INMATE MANSON: Charles Manson, inmate, B-33920.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Would you spell your
    last name please?

    INMATE MANSON: M - A - N - S - U - N.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Thank you. Today, Mr.
    Manson, the panel from the Board of Prison Terms that you see
    before you will once again consider your suitability for parole,
    Certain things we have to go through, so let me go through this, if
    you will please.

    INMATE MANSON: Uh-huh,

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: And we have a
    procedure that we follow, If you follow that it will make it much
    easier on all of us.

    The - you've had nine prior hearings. Let me explain the process so
    you know what's going on, The hearing is basically broken down
    into three areas. The first area is the instant offense and I'll
    incorporate that instant offense.

    And then I'll give you - and read the instant offense - and then I'll
    give you the opportunity to make corrections or additions to the
    instant offense, Then I'll talk about your prior criminality -

    INMATE MANSON: I don't understand instant defense.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Instant. That's the
    offense that you're in here for, The murders -

    INMATE MANSON: Instant?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes.

    INMATE MANSON: Offense?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes. Offenses that
    you're in here for. We'll then go to your social factors and your
    prior criminality and then we'll go to the second part of the hearing
    which is your post-conviction factors and your psychiatric
    evaluation. That will be handled by Deputy Commissioner Brown on
    my far right.

    The third area of the hearing are your parole plans and
    Commissioner Aceto will handle your parole plans.
    From there we go to questions by any one of the Commissioners
    regarding any part of the hearing, and then questions by the
    District Attorney. The District Attorney will pose the questions to
    the panel and when you answer his questions would you please
    answer the panel.

    Do you understand what's going on here so far?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes. I have a couple questions.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right. It's alright. Let
    me finish and then you can ask. We'll then go to closing
    statements. The first closing statement will be by the District
    Attorney and then you'll have the opportunity for the final closing
    statement. We will then recess. We'll make a decision and call you
    back. Everybody will clear the room when we recess, make a
    decision. We'll call you back and we'll read into the record that
    decision.

    There are certain rights you are afforded, Mr. Manson. You were
    notified of the hearing. I saw where you were notified, however
    you refused to sign the notification. Also, you had an opportunity
    to review your central file and I don't know whether you did or not.
    Did you review your central file?

    INMATE MANSON: I've been checking this thing out that I'm sent
    here.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. All right, good.
    You also have a right to appeal the decision within ninety days of
    receiving that decision.

    You have a right to an impartial panel, Mr. Manson. Do you have
    any problems with the three representatives from the Board of
    Prison Terms you see before you today?

    INMATE MANSON: No, not at all.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Thank you. You'll
    receive a tentative written decision today. The decision will be
    effective in approximately sixty days after the Board of Prison
    Terms' review process has taken place.

    You are not required, Mr. Manson, to discuss the matter with the
    panel if you do not wish to. But you must keep in mind that the
    Board of Prison Terms' panel accepts as true the Court findings in
    the case, the fact that you are guilty of these murders. Are you
    going to talk to the panel today and answer questions?
    INMATE MANSON: Yes. Yes, sir.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Would you raise your
    right hand as best as possible. Do you solemnly swear or affirm that
    the testimony you give today will be the truth, the whole truth and
    nothing but the truth?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, sir.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Thank you. Okay, at
    this time I'm going to incorporate the instant offense from the
    decision held on December the 1st, 1982, pages two through six.

    INMATE MANSON: I don't have that.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. I'm going to read
    it to you so you can - if you would listen to- and then I'll give you
    opportunity to make corrections or additions to the instant offense.

    INMATE MANSON: I'm a little nervous.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. Just settle down
    because it's very informal and we want you to relax as we go
    through this. Are you still - you're nervous?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes. Yes, yes, very. I've been a long time sitting
    in that cell -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Well, we have a lot of
    people who -

    INMATE MANSON: - I'm not used to people that much.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. Let me read the
    instant offense. If you'll listen please -

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Mr. Chairman? Mr.
    Chairman?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: we need to make a
    correction. The date is the -- April 21st.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Excuse me, The date
    today is April the 21st, 1992. Thank you.

    Shortly before midnight on August - I'm reading from the second -
    third page - second page of the Board report dated 12/01/82.
    Shortly before midnight on August 8, 1969 the prisoner informed his
    crime partners that now is the time for helter skelter. The crime
    partners were directed to accompany Charles Watson to carry out
    the orders given by the prisoner. The crime partners at the time
    were Linda Cabastian

    UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: Kasabian.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Kasabian, Susan Atkins
    and Patricia Krenwinkel. As the crime partners were in the car
    getting ready to leave the area, the prisoner informed them, "you
    girls know what I mean," something to which he instructed them to
    leave a sign.
    Crime partner Watson drove directly to 10050 Selio -
    Selio [phonetic spelling] Drive where he stopped the car. Linda
    Kasabian held three knives and one gun during the trip. Watson
    then cut the overhead telephone wires at the scene and parked
    the vehicle.

    INMATE MANSON: Excuse me. Where we getting this from?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: This is from the Board
    report dated 12/01/82. Do you have a copy of that?

    INMATE MANSON: No, I don't. Who - whose signature's on the end
    of that?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: This is a Board report.
    This is the hearing that was held at that particular time -

    INMATE MANSON: Uh-huh.
    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: - and this was the
    reading of the instant offense at that particular time.

    INMATE MANSON: That sounds like a book.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Well, if you'll listen and
    then you can make corrections.

    INMATE MANSON: Yes. Okay.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right. Crime partner
    Atkins and Krenwinkel had been in the back seat with Linda
    Kasabian, the passenger in the right front seat. Watson then
    carried some [inaudible] over the hill and to the outer premises of
    10050 Selio Drive.

    The vehicle containing victim Stephen Parent [phonetic spelling]
    approached the gate opening into the street. Watson stopped him
    at gunpoint and Parent stated, "please don't hurt me, I won't say
    anything.' Watson shot Parent five times and turned off the ignition
    of his car.

    All of the crime partners then proceeded to the house where
    Watson cut a window screen. Linda Kasabian acted as a lookout
    while another female crime partner entered the residence through
    an open window and admitted the other crime partners.

    Within the residence the prisoner's crime partners, without
    provocation, logic or reason, murdered Abigail Anne Folger by
    inflicting a total of 28 multiple stab wounds on her body. Victim
    Wachezski - excuse me - victim -

    MR. KAY: Voitek [phonetic spelling]

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Voitek, count two, was
    killed by multiple stab wounds. A gunshot wound to his left back
    and multiple forced trauma of blunt nature to the head. Victim
    Sharon Tate Polanski was killed with multiple stab wounds. Victim
    Jay Sebring was killed by multiple stab wounds.

    On August the 10th, 1969, the prisoner drove his crime partners to
    a location near the residence of victim Leo and Rosemary LaBanca
    - LaBianca. The prisoner entered the LaBianca home alone at
    gunpoint and tied up the victims.

    He impressed them with the statement that they would not be
    harmed and that a robbery was taking place. He then returned to
    the vehicle containing his crime partners and then directed them to
    enter that residence and kill the occupants. He informed them not
    to notify the victims that they would be killed.

    Crime partner Charles Watson, Patricia Krenwinkel, Leslie Van
    Houten, then entered the residence and the prisoner drove away
    from the scene. The crime partners entered the residence and in a
    callous manner killed Leo LaBianca by inflicting multiple stab wounds
    to his neck and abdomen. Rosemary LaBianca was killed by multiple
    stab wounds which were inflicted to the neck and trunk.

    The crime partners carved the wood war - the word war on the Leo
    LaBianca's stomach with the use of a carving fork.
    At both of the
    above murder scenes, the prisoner's crime partners used blood of
    their victims to write the words. Under case number A-267861, the prisoner was received into the
    institution on December 13th, 1971 for violation of first degree
    murder concurrent with prior term.
    The pistol, knives and swords
    were used in the following crimes which the prisoner committed
    with crime partners Bira Alstea- how do you pronounce that?

    MR. KAY: Beausoleil.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Beausoleil, and Atkins
    and Grogan and Davis. The prisoner directed the crime partners to
    go to the home of victim Gary Allen Highman -

    MR. KAY: Hinman.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: - and have him sign
    over his property. The crime partners followed the prisoner's
    directions and on July 26th, 1969 they contacted the prisoner from
    the Hinman residence.
    Prisoner and Davis then went to the Hinman
    home and the prisoner struck Hinman with a sword severing a part
    of the right ear and causing a laceration to the left side of his face
    from his ear to his mouth. The prisoner and Davis then drove away
    from the crime scene in Hinman's automobile.

    On July 27th, 1969 after suffering three days of tortuous
    treatment, Hinman was killed by a stab wound through the heart
    which was inflicted by Beausoleil.

    When Hinman was found in the Topanga Canyon home on July 31st,
    1969 he had been stabbed through the heart in addition to
    suffering a stab wound in the chest, a gash on the top of his head,
    a gash behind the right ear, and a laceration on the left side of his
    face which cut his ear and cheek.

    This concludes the reading of the instant offense. Do you have any
    additions or corrections, Mr. Manson, to the-

    INMATE MANSON: I'd like to know who signed that, who put their
    name on it.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Nobody put their name
    on it. This was a hearing conducted in 1982. Your hearing was
    conducted at that particular time and that's the reading of the
    instant offense as taken from the probation officeris report at the
    time of the trial that you had. Do you have any corrections or
    additions to that?

    INMATE MANSON: No. We could correct the whole thing because
    it's basically hearsay.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. Do you remember
    what I said at the beginning of the hearing?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: I said that we accept
    as true the court findings in the case. The fact that you were
    found guilty and you are guilty of those particular murders. If
    there's any change or anything you wanted to say about -

    INMATE MANSON: So all that is reality to you?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes. Yes, we accept it
    as true -

    INMATE MANSON: And that - and either - even it never happened
    it's still reality to you?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes, because you were
    found guilty by a court of law.

    INMATE MANSON: And - okay - and all the things that in that
    courtroom that went through that courtroom is reality to you?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes. Okay. We accept
    as true -

    INMATE MANSON: Now let me - let me just say one thing.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay.

    INMATE MANSON: Nine black Muslims and three Mexicans signed a
    writ that said I was Jesus Christ. Is that reality to you as well?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: I didn't read that in the
    Board report.

    INMATE MANSON: Oh, well it's in the record. I mean, you know.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Well, we've read - we
    have your C-file and all the reports were made available to us.

    INMATE MANSON: Okay.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: And I think we know
    most about, but that's the reason for the hearing, Mr. Manson -

    INMATE MANSON: Okay, okay.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: - that you can bring
    these things out if you wish.

    INMATE MANSON: I think if you'll look in your own minds for every
    point, there's a counterpoint. For every red, there's a black. For
    every black, there's a red.

    In other words t what you're making me into in your reports so that
    you can write your books and do your Rambo trips and make your
    movies for public entertainment, is not really what happened and
    what happened could have been explained but if you will allow me
    to call a witness?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: No. We do not allow
    witnesses in here -

    INMATE MANSON: I mean, it's within the panel. I'd like to question
    that man in front of the panel.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: No. We do not allow
    that, Mr. Manson. We have a procedure that we follow.

    INMATE MANSON: Okay. All right.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Now, if you want to tell
    about the crime -

    INMATE MANSON: Okay.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: - then go ahead and
    tell about the crime. Otherwise [inaudible] -

    INMATE MANSON: Then I will say it and then if it isn't true, he can
    interrupt it through you, and then we can talk through you. Is that
    legal?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: You may- you may -
    [inaudible]

    INMATE MANSON: It says here that I can call witnesses on this
    paper here.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: No.

    INMATE MANSON: This says I got these rights to do that.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: No, you do not. If you
    would please respond to me there - any additions or corrections to
    the instant offense that I just read?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes. I didn't tie anybody up.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay.

    INMATE MANSON: I was never on the scene where anyone was
    killed. I think the law says you can only keep me 17 years or 18
    years if I was never on the scene when anyone was killed. I was
    never on the crime scene of anything.

    The closest I came to the crime scene is I cut Hinman's ear off in a
    fight over some money because the Frenchman - he wouldn't pay
    the Frenchman and I told him, why don't he be a man about himself
    and pay his debts? And we had a fight.

    So to - in order to hook me up to that they say well, they tortured
    the dude three days. I was gone from that scene of that crime for
    three days. I was never on the scene of any crime. I never told
    anyone directly to do - to go anywhere and do anything.

    I always said - and mostly it come from the witness stand - I said
    like, you know what to do, you have a brain of your own, don't ask
    me what to do, I've just got out of prison, I don't know what's
    going on out here. I hadn't been out of jail long enough to really
    get a perspective of what was happening.

    I just was released from McNeil Island and I was in Mexico City
    prison before that and I was in Terminal Island before that. So I
    really wasn't up on the sixties as much as you all make me out to
    be. I had just got out of prison.

    Most of those people, I - like Kasabian, I knew her two weeks. I
    had seen her two or three times around the ranch. I had never
    even been with the broad, man, that much, you know. People came
    around me because I played a lot of music and I was fairly free and
    open because I really didn't know, honestly.

    Everyone says that I was the leader of those people, but I was
    actually the follower of the children because, like I never grew up.
    I've been in jail most of this time, so I stayed in the minds of the
    children. And I'm pretty much a street person so violence is no new
    thing to me. And people getting hurt around me is no new thing.
    I've lived in prison all my life. That happens all the time. I've always
    walked on a line. In Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, all across this
    country. Cook County jail, Chicago, it's always about fighting.
    That's part of everyday life where I live, you know.

    So, a lot of the things that people were doing were just their own
    little episodes that they get involved in and they looked at me like I
    was something like a friend or a brother or a father or someone
    that understood because I learned in prison that you can't really
    tell any one anything because everybody's got their own
    perspective. And all you can do is reflect people back at
    themselves and let them make up their own mind about things.

    So, when Beausoleil come to me with, could I be a brother? I told
    him certainly, you know. So we were like in a little brotherhood
    together, like we didn't lie to each other. And whatever he said do,
    I would do. And whatever I said do, he would do.

    But as far as lining up someone for some kind of helter skelter trip,
    you know, that's the District Attorney's motive. That's the only
    thing he could find for a motive to throw up on top of all that
    confusion he had.There was no such thing in my mind as helter
    skelter. Helter skelter was a song and it was a nightclub - we
    opened up a little after-hours nightclub to make some money and
    play some music and do some dancing and singing and play some
    stuff to make some money for dune buggies to go out in the
    desert.

    And we called the club Helter Skelter. It was a helter skelter club
    because we would be there and when the cops would come, we'd
    all melt into other dimensions because it wasn't licensed to be
    anything in particular. And that was kind of like a speakeasy back
    in the moonshine days behind the movie set.

    And I'm an outlaw. That's - they're right there, you know, and I'm a
    gangster and I'm bad and I'm all the things that I want to be. I'm
    pretty free within myself. I cut people and I shoot them and I do
    whatever I have to do to survive in the world I live in. But that has
    nothing to do with me breaking the line.

    Let me explain something about the penitentiary in my mind. I came
    to Gilbault in Terre Haute, Indiana overlooking the federal
    penitentiary in Indiana. And I was raised by a bunch of monks that
    taught us how to tell the truth and how to play handball and how
    to box in a boxing ring.

    So, I learned to fight early and I ran off and stole a bicycle and
    then I went to reform school for that. And I ran off from reform
    school. And all my life I've been in prison. I've been in jail running
    off. I never went to school. I've never grown up. I've never
    accepted the system. I've always accepted the ole man, the ole
    winos and I accepted the retired veterans that were guards at the
    prisons and county supervisors and such.

    But there's a line that man walks. All men walk a line. And I walk
    that line in prison. I don't tell on other people. I don't carry tales
    about other people. If someone's going to kill themselves, I feel
    obligated by Christian ethics to tell him don't do that, your life is
    worth more than that. But if he continues to go on a
    self-destructive path, I step from his way. I get out of his way.
    I've learnt that in prison.

    Someone's got a knife and they're going to do something, I say
    don't do that. And they say I'm going to do it, I say I'm gone. It's
    got nothing to do with me. So they call me on the phone and said
    the guy's got a gun, what do I do? I said, well if he's got a gun he
    must be afraid of something.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Hold on a minute. I think
    he's kind of straying away from what you had going -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay.

    INMATE MANSON: I 'm right there in Beausoleil's murder

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes. I think he's talking
    - that's alright. [inaudible]

    INMATE MANSON: I'm right there on the telephone where he called
    and asked me what to do, This is the point where I got convicted.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Go ahead, Mr. Manson.

    INMATE MANSON: It would come from the witness stand that when
    on the telephone the only thing that ever connected me with
    Hinman's murder was Beausoleil called me and asked me what to do
    and I told him, you know what to do. I didn't tell him like, [raising
    voice] you know what to do. I told him, man, you're a man, grow
    up juvenile. Don't ask me what to do. Stand on your own two feet.
    Be responsible for your own actions. Don't ask me what to do. I
    just got out of prison. I don't want to go back to jail.

    I know what walking that line is. It's a straight razor in the barber
    shop in McNeil Island. I've worked in a straight razor, I've worked in
    the barber shop in the McNeil Island. I was with all the ole men
    that came out a Alcatraz. I don't break the law. The old man tells
    me, if you don't break the law, you don't have to go to jail.
    You
    break the law, you're putting yourself in jail. The law is there and
    the will of God. You break that law, you're breaking the will of God
    and you're going to go to jail. When I got out, that was my symbol.
    Everybody else was doing this and this and different symbols. I
    would do that. And they'd say, what is that symbol? I'd say, that
    symbol is, I got one positive thought. I'm in a rebirth movement.

    I just come out a prison. I got a chance to start over. And I'm
    starting over and I'm not breaking no laws. So don't come around
    me with no- nothing. I don't want no money. I'll eat out of garbage
    cans. I'll stay on the complete bottom. I'm underneath this snake
    here. I'm not breaking no law.

    So a lot a people came to me from the underworld and in the
    outlaw world and run away from the war, from the Vietnam War.
    That was - what's his name - them guys that testified for you on
    them motorcycles. Them Italian kids that came off of that Venice,
    California. They took the witness stand and they said everything
    they could get away with to get their cases dropped. There wasn't
    a witness that took that witness stand -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. I don't want to
    go into the hearing, Mr. Manson. Just talk about the crime. Any
    changes from what I read which is -

    INMATE MANSON: Well, that's what made that- that's what wrote
    that down is what all these people said to you guys, you know.
    They told you all these trips about what I said, and when I said it,
    and how in the hell -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: But any more

    INMATE MANSON: - could you possibly know what I said to
    somebody 25 years ago in the corner of - when we were only
    talking to ourselves and I couldn't even remember what that - what
    I said. I may have said just anything, but I know what I would say
    now and I don't lie, so I know what I would say then, you know.
    And I certainly wouldn't tell nobody to go in and do nothing to
    anybody that I wouldn't want done to me.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay.

    INMATE MANSON: Listen, listen. I got enough sense to know that if
    I spit on you, that you - that gives you the God-given right to spit
    on me back. Anything I do to you got the right to do right back to
    me. And I'm not going get caught up in that. I've been in jail long
    enough to know if you go over on the other side of that yard and
    you beat somebody up and you walk that lines, pretty sooner or
    later somebody's going beat you up.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. Let me go on a
    little bit, okay, and talk about your prior criminality. You've covered
    it pretty well. It says here that you started your criminal history
    when you were very young, is that right? Back in '48 you went to
    Terre Haute, Indiana Boys School because of a burglary of a
    grocery store. And then you went AWOL from the school and was
    placed in Indiana State Reformatory -

    INMATE MANSON: Before you get into that, before you rush me off
    into that.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay.

    INMATE MANSON: Every time I go to these committees

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Uh-huh.

    INMATE MANSON: - I'll wait two or three years for you and I'll sit in
    the cell and stare at the wall for two or three years just waiting for
    you people. And then when you get here you can't even give me
    five minutes.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: No -

    INMATE MANSON: You're in such a rush, you know, you know.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right. Then what I -

    INMATE MANSON: You have to slow down with my mind and to - to
    see where your mind is.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right. All right.
    You're right.


    continued next post

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  8. #8
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    INMATE MANSON: Let me say this. The courtroom- Charles Older
    would not been sitting on that bench had I not went in the
    courtroom. So, we're kind a like married in this thought together,
    like we're together whether we want to be here together or not,
    you know, we're stuck in this madness, you know.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Right.

    INMATE MANSON: I don't want this job. I'm not getting paid very
    much, you know.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: No, that's true.

    INMATE MANSON: And you're certainly going to get paid if you take
    your time, so give me time to finish what I was trying to do, will
    you, please?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Is it on the crime, Mr.
    Manson?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes sir, it is.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. Then -

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, sir. It's the very same thing that you read.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay.

    INMATE MANSON: You know, I kind of anticipated what you were
    going to say because you've been saying the same thing for 20
    years.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right.

    INMATE MANSON: This has grown so much that the people living in
    my life have moved in with uniforms and penitentiaries. They built
    whole penitentiaries in the fear that they generated off of this
    case. So the public can feel safe against this monster, we're going
    to charge you 200 million dollars to build another set of
    penitentiaries.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Mr. Manson -
    INMATE MANSON: so people living in my life, they don't care
    whether I broke the law or not. They'll make up a lot a things and
    sell a lot a books, 58 of them to be exact, and billions of dollars has
    been made. And it's okay if I have to spend my life in prison - let
    me finish - just to hold me because I've shown you some strong
    strength and I haven't surrendered to - to this by - by copping out
    to you or telling tales on someone else or playing weak. You've
    medicated me, you've burnt me, you've beat me, you've stabbed
    me, you've done everything you can do to me and I'm still here.
    And you're still going have to face the truth about this case sooner
    or later. If not here -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: [inaudible]

    INMATE MANSON: - in the street.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right, Mr. Manson.
    I'm going to give you an opportunity to give a closing statement
    and you can read that or talk about that at that particular time.
    We're going to now talk about your prior criminality. I said before,
    and I think you stated that you were placed in a boys school at an
    early age, in 1948, for burglary. You tried to escape from there or
    run away, whatever it was, and you were placed in Indiana State
    Reformatory.

    Again went AWOL in February of '51. You stole an automobile, went
    to Utah. You were arrested there and you were convicted of the
    Dyer Act and sentenced to the National Training School for Boys in
    Washington, D.C.

    Your adult convictions there are one, two, three, four, five, six,
    seven, eight or nine adult convictions beginning in 1955 and ending
    in 1969. They've consisted of the Dyer Act - you were sentenced
    to three years in federal prison for that, attempted escape, five
    years probation; forgery, mail theft, ten years suspended; Los
    Angeles probation violation; ten years federal prison, McNeil Island,
    Washington; South Ukiah, interfering with an officer, three years
    probation; and in Ventura possession of a drivers license and in Los
    Angeles, was the instant offense of murders.
    Now you said you also spent time in Mexico in a prison.

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, I was in Mexico for -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: In prison down there?

    INMATE MANSON: In Mexico City, prison, yes. Immigration prison.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: What was that for?

    INMATE MANSON: I had been accused of killing some French people
    and a couple dudes in Acapulco.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: And how long were you
    in prison down there?

    INMATE MANSON: I was there a couple different times.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: A couple times?

    INMATE MANSON: Uh-huh.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: I have here under your
    personal factors, Mr. Manson, that you were born on - in 1934 in
    Cincinnati, Ohio. Your mother was Kathy Maddox, who never - and
    you never saw your natural father.

    INMATE MANSON: That's not true.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: It's not true?

    INMATE MANSON: No. My father's name was William Manson.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: William?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: And did you live with
    him for a while?

    INMATE MANSON: No. You know, it's one of those divorce trips
    where you see a guy walk by and he's your father and you really
    don't - you know, I remember his boots -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes.

    INMATE MANSON: - and I remember him when he went to the war.
    I remember when he - his uniform, but I don't remember what he
    really looked like.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Your mother was
    arrested shortly after the birth and sentenced to prison for assault
    and robbery?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: And you lived with your
    maternal grandparents in West Virginia. You don't have a southern
    accent, do you?

    INMATE MANSON: When I need it.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes, when you need it.
    you later resided in foster homes until you were made a ward of the
    court in '47. The rest of your juvenile life was spent in various
    informatories, reformatories and boys schools in Pennsylvania and
    Indiana. You dropped out of school at the age of 9 in the third
    grade. You married Rosealie Willis in 1954. The marriage ended in
    divorce in 1956. You have one son, Charles, Jr. which resulted from
    this marriage, but you have not seen your son since the divorce. Is
    that correct, Mr. Manson?

    INMATE MANSON: I don't know.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Okay. It says here, no
    military service. You used L.S.D. extensively, mescaline,
    amphetamines and barbiturates, but no alcohol. Is that correct?

    INMATE MANSON: No.


    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: No? Enlighten me.
    INMATE MANSON: I've taken a few tabs of acid, I smoked grass, I
    smoked a little hash. I don't mess with drugs, per se. I don't do
    anything self destructive. I like the cactus buds. They're a spiritual
    experience, and I -

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Peyote?

    INMATE MANSON: And mushrooms are okay.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes.

    INMATE MANSON: I drink scotch whiskey. I like scotch whiskey and
    I drink beer occasionally. I'm not much of a wine drinker, but now
    and then some wine with meals is alright.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: You get any of that in
    here?

    INMATE MANSON: No, no, no.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right. We're going to
    - remember I said there was three areas of the hearing. The
    second area is your post-conviction factors. We may come back to
    this. I told you one area we have questions.

    INMATE MANSON: Do I get to say anything about that?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Oh, yes. We're going to
    do that in just a little bit. We're going to go to your
    post-conviction factors and your psychiatric factors and your
    psychiatric evaluation. Now, that's everything that's happened to
    you since your last hearing, and also the evaluation and Deputy
    Commissioner Brown will handle that on my far right.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Thank you, Mr. Koenig.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: You're welcome.

    INMATE MANSON: Do I get a minute here - in between there?

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Why do you want a
    minute?

    INMATE MANSON: To respond to just what that record that you
    laid out there?

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: We'll go back to that.
    You -

    INMATE MANSON: There's just no way my mind can handle that.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right-

    INMATE MANSON: In other words, I don't have the papers you
    have and I can't refer to what you're referring to, you know.

    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: Yes. You may respond
    to this right now, if you wish. Go ahead.

    INMATE MANSON: Okay, okay. What that whole first 11 years being
    locked up in was trying to get away. You've got a juvenile. You
    lock him up in juvenile hall, you don't know anything. He's got no
    parents. He's got nobody telling him the truth. Everybody's lying to
    him. So the only thing he can do is run away.

    So that's all I did. I ran away. And everytime I ran away, they just
    got me and put me in a harder place to get away. So everytime I
    would run away, they would take me and put me in a more difficult
    place to run away until I got to the federal prison system.
    I ran through Indiana and I ran through Illinois and I ran through
    Ohio. And then when they put me in Washington, D.C., Dr. Hartman
    put me in Virginia, Natural Bridge Camp with a [inaudible] and that
    was in 1952 - '51. Then I went to Petersburg - Camp Petersburg,
    Virginia where they got the military academy.

    And then I went to Pennsylvania, then I went to Ohio, and then in
    1954 I got out and I [inaudible] knew what I was doing. I'm still
    nine years old in third grade in my mind. I couldn't very well know
    what was going on, you know, I never had any help from anyone.
    No one ever done anything for me.

    So what I did was I married the first girl I came to and stole a car
    and came to California because that's where she wanted to come
    and I just followed her around like a blind guy because I really don't
    - California was a -you know, I didn't know what California was.
    you know, I'm this dumb hillbilly. I thought the pigeons were sea
    gulls and the sea gulls were pigeons. I didn't know the difference,
    you know.

    So when I got to California, it was all about fighting in the county
    jail. I wasn't out there on the street but what, maybe two or three
    weeks before they had me in the jail back in Terminal Island.
    So I went through the lieutenant there and they brought the guys
    - the lieutenants and the men that were in the uniforms from the
    dentist office and all the Navy and the doctors from Dr. Hartman,
    they brought them from back East, they brought them to Terminal
    Island with a lot of the old time gangsters that were being
    released. They're going to Needles, California and out in the desert,
    to doing different things in the - in the Mafia world, in that old
    underworld, where they made all that moonshine stuff.

    So I learned all the things they learned. So this - I'm picking up all
    these things from all these older men. So they're laying out to me
    what's right and what's wrong, and I don't really know what's right
    and what's wrong, because people that say what's right and
    wrong, they're not doing what they say. They're doing something
    different than what they say, you know. So I had to find all this
    out for myself.

    So then when you keep calling me a criminal and keep calling me a
    bad guy, then I got to be all the things that you think in your mind
    that I am, which is - that's not really what I am. you got me being
    a bastard, you got me being a dope fiend. You got me being
    everything's bad. I'm only five foot tall. I was five-seven, then I
    went to five-six, now I'm down to five-two. I figure about another
    20 years, I'll be about four feet tall, because everybody's just
    constantly pushing it over on me, like they got permission to get
    away with doing anything they want to do to me, because I don't
    have no parents, because I don't have no money, because I don't
    have no education.

    You've got to have some education or some parents or you're not
    smart. You've got to be stupid if you don't read and write, you
    know. You've got to be all the things that are bad if you ain't got
    nobody to protect you, because you find out in that cell, the only
    person that loves you, Jesus Christ.

    And that rebirth movement in 1967 was mine. Now you can tell
    Carter and all them other people that have been stealing my life
    everyday and living in my reality, you know, that they can read
    Corinthians 13, chapter verse, you know. And that'll handle that
    part of it. That's the end of what I got to say then.

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  9. #9
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    PRESIDING BOARD COMMISSIONER KOENIG: All right. You did a good
    job there. We're going to go to the second area of the hearing
    now. Mr. Brown will handle your post- convictions.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: I want to start right in
    with your C.D.C. 115s. You have about 60 of them. And it doesn't
    appear that you have been doing very much to change them. I
    won't go all the way back past 1981. As a matter of fact, I'll start
    in '83. Your last time you appeared before the Board was 1981, and
    I'm sure that that panel reviewed all of those 115s with you prior to
    that time.

    There are 60 of them starting from that time. Disrespect towards
    staff, possession of hacksaw blade. Do you have a copy of those?

    INMATE MANSON: No.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: [Inaudible] violence,
    dangerous properties?

    INMATE MANSON: No. No, I know what all those are though.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: I want you - I'm going to
    read a couple this year that you had. March 14th, 1992 threatening
    staff. [reading] on 03/14/92 at approximately 1510 hours while
    conducting my duties as floor officer, I was sweeping up a tier
    [inaudible] when Inmate Manson, B-33920 verbally demanded I go
    out to the S.H.U. yard and clear the showers now - clean the
    showers now because in my - in his opinion they're dirty. I informed
    Inmate Manson that I didn't have time to clean them today. Inmate
    Manson began to call me a liar and treacherous bitch. Inmate
    Manson also stated, I would like to break all the bones in your body
    starting with your elbow working down to your knees. Then Inmate
    Manson stated, tell that man up there, the patrol group operator to
    open his cell door and let me beat you into submission so that you'll
    be under my power. [end reading]
    Do you recall that?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Threatening staff -

    INMATE MANSON: Do I get to explain it?

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: You want to explain that?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: You got it. Go ahead.

    INMATE MANSON: Prison is a treacherous place to live in. you miss
    one move, and you get stabbed. You've got to be aware of
    everything that goes on. There's nothing that you can overlook.
    You've got to be aware of your air and ventilator that you breath,
    because if you've got emphysema and a Ninja warrior gets in your
    air, he can stop your air.

    So I'm in the shower area. They got some rust that's coming out of
    the pipes, and this rust is building up and it looks just exactly like
    instant coffee. If you take a spoonful of that rust and you mix it in
    with instant coffee and you give somebody a cup of coffee, you
    can burn their kidneys out, you can kill them.

    So there's a deadly substance out in the yard that needs cleaned
    up, because if I'm aware of this substance, when someone else
    comes out they see this substance, they may pick some of it up
    and put it in my coffee. So I try to be aware of everything.

    So I asked the woman when she came to work - I said, would you
    take the hose that you've been watering me down with and
    squirting me with when no one's looking and go out there and squirt
    down that yard and clean up that mess out there, to where - and
    she says, well, no, she wasn't going to do that. I said, well,
    somebody needs to do that because it's a danger, you know. So
    she said she didn't want to do it and she called me a liar so I called
    her a liar back.

    Now, whether you want to accept this or not, the deer in the
    woods - there's a doe and there's a buck. And the buck comes up
    to doe and scares the doe and the doe turns around and backs
    up to the buck. That's a matriarch and a patriarch. I live in a
    patriarch. You live in a matriarch. You back up to your women. I
    don't back up to my women. I don't take no lip from my women. I
    don't give them none, but I don't take none either.

    If they disrespect me, I'll disrespect them back. If they hit me, I'll
    hit them back.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: I 'm going to interrupt
    you. I'm going to read these other two, because they're along the
    same line. You keep your thought, and I'll let you continue to go in
    that vein for a short while longer, but I'm not going to allow you to
    ramble all day.

    INMATE MANSON: You got it.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: The second one, February
    the 1st, 1992, written by an officer by the name of Bass and you
    told her Bass you're a fucking punk. She attempted to counsel. You
    stated, open this - Bass open this fucking door and I'll take that
    stick away from you and beat your ass with it.

    You got another one, February the 10th, i992, officer by the name
    of Moony. You became verbally abusive saying, get your nose out
    of my ass, you bitch. When I attempted to proceed with the C.D.C.
    115, Manson exposed his penis, and said, suck my dick, you white
    bitch, you're nothing but a witch. Manson then proceeded to spit
    on me.

    You may go ahead with your - conclude your statement that you
    were making about why this kind of behavior keeps going on, as far
    as you're concerned.

    INMATE MANSON: Prison is a place where they keep men. They
    chew tobacco, they spit, they cuss, they do bad things. They ride
    horses, they fall down. It's not a place where women should be
    working.

    Women come in here and we're sitting on the toilet. We have to
    bare down and take our clothes off and bend over and show our
    private parts and they stand there and gawk. And it's not a place
    for a woman. I wouldn't want my mother working in a prison, if I
    had one. I wouldn't want my sisters, I wouldn't want my old ladies
    working in a prison.

    Prison and the authoritative type jobs kind of- they like certain
    kinds of jobs. Some women that don't like men, they like these kind
    of jobs. They can get over on some men and they feel really good
    about that, because they didn't like their father and they don't like
    men anyway. Well, I don't particularly like men either, whatever
    men is. Or whatever that is to them, it's got nothing to do with
    what it is to me.

    So what it is to me is like - I say a lot of words they say are bad
    words. To me, they're just words. I don't see good words or bad
    words. Good and bad is up to the individual to decide whatever he
    feels likes goods words.

    So when you're talking to a man, you say, hey, you old dirty
    [unintelligible]. You're saying things that you're rapping, what they
    call the dozens, you're rapping back and forwards. Then you got a
    guy and you're sitting there rapping and you let a stinker, and
    there's two guys in the room and (sniff-sniff] one of them smells it
    and looks at the other one, says wasn't me. I mean, there's only
    two of you there. It could - you know, I mean, how are you going
    to lie to yourself, you know.

    So me and this man is standing there and we're rapping and
    man-talking back and forwards and this woman come around the
    corner like I was talking to her. I wasn't talking to her to start with.
    I was talking to the guy.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: You have enough sense to
    understand that when you accumulated this many disciplinaries,
    that somewhere along the line, somebody's saying that you're doing
    it wrong. And somewhere in your mind, you need to make some kind
    of decision that you're going to make a choice to stop.

    INMATE MANSON: Uh-huh.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Now you can sit up and
    you can rationalize and you can come up with all of the rhetoric
    that you want to, but it isn't going to get you out of the hole.
    You're just going to continue to dig yourself in deeper.

    INMATE MANSON: Okay. Can I explain that?

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Go ahead.

    INMATE MANSON: The turnaround, it comes to push, push comes
    to shove, shove comes looking around to see where you're up
    above or down below, where you're at and how it turns. Something
    that says good, says bad, that's good, say what it is, what it is,
    that's cool.

    So when you catch cool you got some fool coming through the
    door, you don't know what he's doing about what. He just come
    and fell out of the water like a fish on the floor. And he don't know
    what he's doing, he got no idea where he's at and he's coming into
    other people's lives talking about words he don't even know nothing
    about it.

    He comes in to my world, my life, and tells me roo- roo-rah, some
    old punk ass mother fucker shit that's going to get me killed if I
    don't put up some force fields in his mind to get his ding-dong ass
    off of me. So I tell him, get off of me. If you don't get off of me, I'll
    teach you how to get off of me. And he learns that, and he turns
    that around and he tells the inmate, you get up against that wall
    and shake down.

    And then he learns his man from getting the man and when they
    feel real secure, then they have to get them 115s in before I get
    to parole, because they want to get them 115s in because they
    don't want to ever let me go, because if they let me go they lose
    the best thing they've got because they feel secure as long as
    they got me locked up in a cell. And they feel like - yeah, they feel
    like they got the man right there in the box where they can go
    back and say what's what to who and says where, and you
    represent and who in what part or whose courtroom, see.

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  10. #10
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    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: All right.

    INMATE MANSON: Here's the thing - let me say this to you Chief
    Thomas [sic]. When we -

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Hold up, hold up just a
    minute. My name -

    INMATE MANSON: Brown - excuse me, Mr. Brown.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: My name is written right
    there and don't you ever call me anything but that name right
    there. Do you understand?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, sir. Yes, sir. Yes, sir.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Now proceed.

    INMATE MANSON: Sure. So it comes to this, it's like, I'm not going
    to try to kid you. I'm not going to try playing nothing with you.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: And I'm not going to play
    with you and let me tell you something else -

    INMATE MANSON: Now, wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute
    -

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: No, no, no. you wait.

    INMATE MANSON: Oh, you want to kick me out of here and
    [inaudible] go home.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: No, I'm not going to kick
    you out of here. No way I'm going to kick you out-

    INMATE MANSON: Well, I just don't - you know, like the words you
    like -

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Hold up. Will you

    INMATE MANSON: - what do you want to prove here?

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: And I'm not going to tell
    Corrections what to do with you, but we're going to follow some
    kind of decorum and procedure in this hearing room.

    INMATE MANSON: Uh-huh.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: I'm going to let you go
    just a little bit longer on this that you're talking about, then we're
    going to move to your psych reports. Now go ahead.

    INMATE MANSON: I reflect the procedure back to stay alive, man,
    and I've got to get nasty sometimes, because everybody you
    sending here working over me is not a nice guy, you know. I think if
    any of you have any experience in jail, you know that jail is not a
    very nice place to be.

    And you have all kinds of different people in all kinds of different
    levels and I have to deal with all those levels. I have to deal with
    every kind of psychotic maniac you got in the world trying to burn
    me up, trying to beat me up, trying to get some attention to get
    me in any kind of direction he can. And I have to propose a certain
    image and keep a certain kind of guy stuck up there to keep those
    bullies off of me. Because if I show any weakness, if I fall down in
    any perspective, I get ate up because I run with a pack of wolves
    and I've got to be a wolf.

    And when it reflects back to you that I'm a no good so and so and
    so forth, I'm reflecting a procedure that's reflected on to me. If I
    don't have any other choice but to get a 115 to stay out of
    something more dangerous or more terrible, rather than stand -
    rather than stay out of my cell and fight this big old ugly guy, I'm
    going to call him a bunch of names so he'll put it on paper. And
    then when he puts it on paper, I say, whew, boy, I didn't have
    togo with that physically, then I could do it mentally.

    As long as I run my jaw mentally and I get it put on the paper,
    then physically I can walk around all the violence and I can stay in
    peace and harmony.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Are you saying that you're
    deliberately keeping yourself placed in a security holding unit?
    INMATE MANSON: No, I'm saying that we're all doing this. We all
    only use each other in different perspectives all the time. If the
    song's saying, love won't let you go - it ain't got nothing to do
    with, love won't let you go. It's people who need you that they
    don't want to let you go.

    They need you for different reasons. They need you to feel secure
    in - because if they got guys they're afraid of, you got two or
    three dudes over there that are bad and you're afraid of them and
    you're a correctional officer, but yet you got a guy over here that
    ain't afraid of you. It's like this woman come to work and she goes
    over to this guy and tells him, turn your radio down, and he tells
    her, shove it right up your ass [inaudible], run her off.

    So she comes over to my cell and because she sees that he's
    afraid of me, so she takes my radio away and looks back at him and
    says, hmnph. So then she uses me to stand up over you, because
    in the darkness on the yard out there, you do what I tell you to do.
    When you're on that committee, I'll do what you tell me to do. I'm
    the man in here. And that's a fact.

    [OFF THE RECORD]
    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: This is Tape 2 in the case
    of Charles Manson, April the 21st, 1992, California State Prison,
    Corcoran, California.

    We're going to proceed to your psychiatric evaluations. You don't
    have one. Well, you had one for this year, but you didn't have one
    completed for the Board of Prison Terms specifically.
    Bruce T. Reed, Ph.D., Clinic Psychologist, went over to see you on
    February the l9th and you refused to be evaluated. Any reason
    why?

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, I had two other doctors trying to evaluate
    me at the same time. I couldn't - I can't write that many books.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: What doctors were trying
    to interview you at that time?

    INMATE MANSON: Well, see the front side, you see the doctor
    coming to me to give me help. The back side, he get his
    information, he'll go to Turkey. He's over in France writing books
    about the psychotherapy or [inaudible] therapy-

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Which doctors came to
    visit you at the time Dr. Reed tried to get in?

    INMATE MANSON: Dr. Christopherson, Dr. White.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Where are they from?

    INMATE MANSON: Right here. Since then, I think Christopherson's
    been fired for ethics violation of some sort. Then there's Willis - Dr.
    Willis.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Willis came over to see
    you this -

    INMATE MANSON: Willis has been my psychiatrist. We went through
    - if you'll check the record, we went through two sessions. He said
    I was okay for level 3. He said that I was alright for level 3.

    What this latest doctor wants is a - what's happening out of 'Frisco
    is this law firm is coming up with new psych evaluation with the
    prisoners union. The prisoner's union in San Quentin, they got a
    bunch of inmates to sign a suit for better psychiatric treatment.
    What that means is more political power because they're using the
    psychiatric base to get their doctors in here so they can get
    doctors up over the uniform, so they can hold the reality up over
    the courts and the minds of the people that live inside the prisons.
    Because when they can do that, then they can do Vacaville.

    See when I left Vacaville, there was 12 dead doctors there of heart
    attacks. Dr. Morgan was the last doctor that they found dead in
    the parking lot with his brains blown out. I went to doctors -

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Dr. Christopherson saw
    you on January the 24th of this year.

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, sir.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: And in his report of that
    date, states that he went over to see you because you were not
    eating. Staff was concerned.

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, he came to see me two or three times
    about that.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: But he didn't appear to be
    concerned because he said you were eating something, either
    candy bars or canteen or -

    INMATE MANSON: Yes, I fast a lot.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: - or whatever, but he
    wasn't concerned about your not eating. He talked about your
    paranoid delusional disorder at that time in his report.
    INMATE MANSON: Perspective.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: He prescribed a plan for
    you and that was to put you on [inaudible] and said this will have
    two affects. One, they will support or deny the fact that he is on
    hunger strike, and they will also give the inmate a chance to get
    out of his cell on occasions as a form of environmental stimulation.
    On the same vein, one, will have more frequent visit to the
    psychiatrist. This too will monitor signs and symptoms of active
    psychosis versus malingering; three, if indeed he's on a hunger
    strike, he should be considered for the M.O.U. What's M.O.U.?
    INMATE MANSON: It's some kind of -

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Memorandum of
    Understanding? If he does refuse psychotropic -

    INMATE MANSON: Medical observation unit.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: Medical observation unit.
    INMATE MANSON: Uh-huh.

    DEPUTY BOARD COMMISSIONER BROWN: If indeed he's on a - if he
    does refuse psychotropic medications, we may ask him [inaudible]
    our decision, which is adjudged ordered involuntary medication. It
    should also be noted that we should have a careful monitoring of
    his intake and output including material from the canteen.
    So he's suggesting that you were kind of faking things a little bit.

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